Blanca de Lizaur, PhD, MA, BA, Content specialist.

Tag: literatura popular

The media and their many problems: KIOSKS SLOW DEATH

The media and their many problems: KIOSKS SLOW DEATH

For everybody, Para:, Magazine
We find some foreign cities both amazing and disappointing. Their broad boulevards, mile-long blocks, mirrored buildings, cleanliness and order, amaze us. Their barren sidewalks, cold coffee shops (literally freezing, since the air conditioning is used to “drive” people out, so other customers can occupy the tables quickly), and the lack of the bustle and chatter of people are ...disenchanting. Seeing somebody else on the street, in fact, doesn't make one feel safer; it may even scare you. Our cities have “life” because there are people out walking, musicians, street markets, people at their windows, human groups of all ages chatting excitedly ─or just playing─, newsstands, touts, con artists everywhere…; and coffee shops or food stalls along the sidewalks and in the squares, with temperat
WHEN EVEN THE MOST COURAGEOUS CRY…

WHEN EVEN THE MOST COURAGEOUS CRY…

Specialized, For media people, Para:
PAPER PRESENTED AT THE CONFERENCE: "VIEJAS IDEAS, NUEVAS CREENCIAS: MÉXICO HACIA EL SIGLO XXI: LA LITERATURA COMO TRANSGRESORA DE LAS FRONTERAS DE IDENTIDAD" ["OLD IDEAS, NEW BELIEFS: MEXICO TOWARDS THE XXI CENTURY: LITERATURE AND ITS TRANSGRESSION OF IDENTITY BORDERS"], ORGANIZED BY UNIVERSIDAD AUTÓNOMA METROPOLITANA (U.A.M., MÉXICO) AND THE UNIV. OF LOUISVILLE, KENTUCKY (U.S.A.), IN JULY, 1995, IN THE BUILDING THAT HOUSED THE FIRST PRINTING PRESS IN THE AMERICAS, MEXICO CITY, D.F. . VERSION CORRECTED BY AUTHOR: ╺ ═══════════════════════════════════════════════════════════════╸ . THE "IMAGO MUNDI" OF WHEN THE COURAGEOUS WEEP. . “──This is what the king who will reign over you will claim as his rights:He will take your sons and make them serve with his c
Have you ever wondered  WHAT “MORBID” CONTENTS ARE?

Have you ever wondered WHAT “MORBID” CONTENTS ARE?

For media people, Para:, Magazine
In our language, and according to the “Diccionario de la Real Academia Española” (Dictionary of the Royal Spanish Academy), morbid means “a change in health [...], illness”. We may deduce that something is morbid when: 1) “it causes illness”, or 2), “causes unhealthy mental [...] reactions”. In English, and according to the Oxford Dictionary, “morbid” refers to someone “ …characterized by an abnormal and unhealthy interest in disturbing and unpleasant subjects, especially death and disease…”. In literary terminology, a morbid device is used to attract people's attention; it's a “hook”. In previous articles we established that works with family-oriented contents, “cleaner”/"more wholesome" ones (that is: those that least violate the values, ideas and beliefs of their target public), t
Little by little, you can grow ACCUSTOMED TO (ALMOST) EVERYTHING!

Little by little, you can grow ACCUSTOMED TO (ALMOST) EVERYTHING!

For media people, Para:, Magazine
There are internationally recognized scientists and thinkers in Mexico.  One of them –and a graduate of our University (UNAM), invented an intravenous serum known as the Sodi polarizing solution, which is commonly used in hospitals all around the world.  I am obviously speaking about Dr. Demetrio Sodi Pallares –may he rest in peace. And all of his research, theories and therapeutic successes arise from a common seminal idea: The certainty that, with respect to our metabolism, an excess of intracellular sodium ions reduces the body’s ability to react adequately to illness. To state this more clearly:  The amount of salt we are used to consume, is bad for our health. A case in point: Western medicine arrived in Kenya long before the Western diet did.  Thanks to this, medical records ha
MARGINALIZED LITERATURE, a new vision of an everlasting cultural issue

MARGINALIZED LITERATURE, a new vision of an everlasting cultural issue

Specialized, For everybody, Para:
This article is devoted to a literary and cultural format that has existed for centuries, not as a particular or singular work, but rather as a constant perpetuation of definable narrative schemas –schemas that always adapted to the latest technology available. . In the realm of “elite” culture, it is considered acceptable to discuss, for example, the timeless nature of art or the validity of the slogan ars pro artis (art for art's sake), since, as Souto says, there is a certain “timelessness in art, that cleanly demarcates the author's interests, as they fade away in the light of the poetic reality by which the work transcends.[1] In the realm of popular culture, however, we do not talk –perhaps– about timeless works, so much as timeless schemas: There is nothing as short-lived a
THE MYSTERIOUS CASE OF THE MISSING SPECTATOR has little to do with the Digital Revolution

THE MYSTERIOUS CASE OF THE MISSING SPECTATOR has little to do with the Digital Revolution

For everybody, Para:, Magazine
An important producer mentioned his concern that film –as in the complete experience of going to the cinema– was dying. There has been a progressive, constant and noteworthy decline in the number of spectators going to the movies over the last 30 years (not necessarily in the amount of money generated by these spectators, as box office prices have raised enormously during the same period).   In part, he blamed the economic crisis; but more importantly –and along with many others in the business, he blamed “videos” for the audience decline.  Who would want to go out to the movie theater when you can enjoy the film right at home, for free or for little? Of course this sounds both logical and reasonable; however it lacks appropriate contextualization. Why?  If “videos” were the only culpri
A test about media, YOU JUST WILL LOVE TO ANSWER!

A test about media, YOU JUST WILL LOVE TO ANSWER!

For media people, Para:, Magazine
In “The mysterious case of the missing spectator”, I made a brief reference to popular, low-end, or low-brow literature as the one that characteristically employs a collective aesthetic. What does this really mean? To clarify the explanation, I’m going to ask you to respond to a few questions regarding various types of works and characters that most of us know and like… . Complete the following sentences, filling the empty spaces with the missing word/s: 1) In a “cops and robbers” story, the “good guy” and the “bad guy” find themselves standing face to face, and one of them yells: “Drop it, buddy, or I’ll blow ___________________!” 2) At the most exciting moment of a romantic story, one of the main characters exclaims: “I’ll never leave you, my darling; nothing and nobody will
WHAT HIGHLY EDUCATED PEOPLE READ…, when nobody watches

WHAT HIGHLY EDUCATED PEOPLE READ…, when nobody watches

For media people, Para:, Magazine
Pygmalion and Galatea… A professor gave his graduate students a poem written by a prestigious contemporary writer. A few minutes later he asked them what their favourite lines were, but nobody dared to answer: The poem, in spite of the author's reputation, was simply terrible. And although we have been trained to consider "beautiful" that which possesses great technical skill (even when the message, what is being said, is clearly horrible), the poem in question was not even technically noteworthy. That said, there is a kind of tacit agreement amongst members of the literary world that they should show their high regard and appreciation for works that the rest of them have praised, regardless of their true quality; and thus why many of us have occasionally been forced to praise “highbrow
ARTICLES THAT INTEREST EVERYBODY (both creators and consumers)

ARTICLES THAT INTEREST EVERYBODY (both creators and consumers)

For everybody
When we study colective aesthetics --like those modelling most popular and folk literatures, there is no way we can divorce the creator from his/her audience. Mass media, just like folk tales, feed precisely from this rich catalogue of cultural elements we all own, as we explained in one of our articles ("A test about media...").  And because of this, creators must redefine themselves as spokesperson of their audiences' values, ideas and beliefs, identify with his/her readers/viewers/listeners, think the way they do, feel with them, and create for and with them. That is why it becomes so difficult to separate those articles that may interest creators, from those that may interest their audiences.  And that is whay we have gatheres articles that interest both of them in this section: