Blanca de Lizaur, PhD, MA, BA, Content specialist.

Tag: Los medios y la familia

The media and their many problems: KIOSKS SLOW DEATH

The media and their many problems: KIOSKS SLOW DEATH

For everybody, Para:, Magazine
We find some foreign cities both amazing and disappointing. Their broad boulevards, mile-long blocks, mirrored buildings, cleanliness and order, amaze us. Their barren sidewalks, cold coffee shops (literally freezing, since the air conditioning is used to “drive” people out, so other customers can occupy the tables quickly), and the lack of the bustle and chatter of people are ...disenchanting. Seeing somebody else on the street, in fact, doesn't make one feel safer; it may even scare you. Our cities have “life” because there are people out walking, musicians, street markets, people at their windows, human groups of all ages chatting excitedly ─or just playing─, newsstands, touts, con artists everywhere…; and coffee shops or food stalls along the sidewalks and in the squares, with temperat
WHEN EVEN THE MOST COURAGEOUS CRY…

WHEN EVEN THE MOST COURAGEOUS CRY…

Specialized, For media people, Para:
PAPER PRESENTED AT THE CONFERENCE: "VIEJAS IDEAS, NUEVAS CREENCIAS: MÉXICO HACIA EL SIGLO XXI: LA LITERATURA COMO TRANSGRESORA DE LAS FRONTERAS DE IDENTIDAD" ["OLD IDEAS, NEW BELIEFS: MEXICO TOWARDS THE XXI CENTURY: LITERATURE AND ITS TRANSGRESSION OF IDENTITY BORDERS"], ORGANIZED BY UNIVERSIDAD AUTÓNOMA METROPOLITANA (U.A.M., MÉXICO) AND THE UNIV. OF LOUISVILLE, KENTUCKY (U.S.A.), IN JULY, 1995, IN THE BUILDING THAT HOUSED THE FIRST PRINTING PRESS IN THE AMERICAS, MEXICO CITY, D.F. . VERSION CORRECTED BY AUTHOR: ╺ ═══════════════════════════════════════════════════════════════╸ . THE "IMAGO MUNDI" OF WHEN THE COURAGEOUS WEEP. . “──This is what the king who will reign over you will claim as his rights:He will take your sons and make them serve with his c
Have you ever wondered  WHAT “MORBID” CONTENTS ARE?

Have you ever wondered WHAT “MORBID” CONTENTS ARE?

For media people, Para:, Magazine
In our language, and according to the “Diccionario de la Real Academia Española” (Dictionary of the Royal Spanish Academy), morbid means “a change in health [...], illness”. We may deduce that something is morbid when: 1) “it causes illness”, or 2), “causes unhealthy mental [...] reactions”. In English, and according to the Oxford Dictionary, “morbid” refers to someone “ …characterized by an abnormal and unhealthy interest in disturbing and unpleasant subjects, especially death and disease…”. In literary terminology, a morbid device is used to attract people's attention; it's a “hook”. In previous articles we established that works with family-oriented contents, “cleaner”/"more wholesome" ones (that is: those that least violate the values, ideas and beliefs of their target public), t
MARGINALIZED LITERATURE, a new vision of an everlasting cultural issue

MARGINALIZED LITERATURE, a new vision of an everlasting cultural issue

Specialized, For everybody, Para:
This article is devoted to a literary and cultural format that has existed for centuries, not as a particular or singular work, but rather as a constant perpetuation of definable narrative schemas –schemas that always adapted to the latest technology available. . In the realm of “elite” culture, it is considered acceptable to discuss, for example, the timeless nature of art or the validity of the slogan ars pro artis (art for art's sake), since, as Souto says, there is a certain “timelessness in art, that cleanly demarcates the author's interests, as they fade away in the light of the poetic reality by which the work transcends.[1] In the realm of popular culture, however, we do not talk –perhaps– about timeless works, so much as timeless schemas: There is nothing as short-lived a
How to make a movie say WHAT YOU WANT TO

How to make a movie say WHAT YOU WANT TO

For audiences, Magazine
. An author's message... Many years ago, one of my university professors refused to explain what “the message” of a literary work is, because he himself didn´t understand  what it was.  I soon realized that he did know, but was cleverly avoiding confrontation with his students in regards to values, ideas and beliefs, given that the “message” of a story  usually exposes its author’s ideology. The ideology ­­–and this is important– colors every piece of information we transmit, and particularly every literary work, every work of art, every mass media product.  Ideology, in fact, intensifies (positively or negatively) the feelings these works awaken in us. Consequently, the “politically correct” version (that is: the “ideology-neutral” version)  of a tale such as Snow White  is perceived
FOR AUDIENCES WHO LONG TO HAVE FUN WITHOUT SUFFERING (including parents, teachers and all kinds of consumers)

FOR AUDIENCES WHO LONG TO HAVE FUN WITHOUT SUFFERING (including parents, teachers and all kinds of consumers)

For audiences
This web is the result of a seminal discovery, expressed by an uncountable number of impartial consumer and scientific studies: That both because of personal and social reasons, the majority of us want and need  fun contents in media --that is:  to have an appropriate amount of fun,  in a way and amount that seems healthy to our plurisecular cultures. That is why we will gather those of our articles that may interest consumers more, in the  "For audiences (parents, teachers...)"  section of this web. We hope you will like them.  We also hope you will soon start sharing with us your experiences, projects, ideas and material --we'll do our best to accomodate them here, as long as their reproduction is possible, relevant and legal. Welcome home!  Better and more profitable media
HELP SAVE MEDIA PEOPLE! (artists, creators, producers, publishers, distributors…)

HELP SAVE MEDIA PEOPLE! (artists, creators, producers, publishers, distributors…)

For media people
The Stone monolith that today stands in Saint Peter’s Square in Rome, was carved in Egypt 4000 years ago.  In the year 37 AD, the emperor Caligula ordered that it be moved to Rome.  This was a truly ambitious engineering challenge at the time, as well as proof of the Roman Empire’s power. Almost 1,150 years later, due to natural historical developments, it was necessary to move it to its present location.  Although only a few hundred meters distant, this too necessitated incredible effort and ingenuity and was almost an impossible task given the technology and resources available in Rome in 1586. Domenico Fontana, the chief engineer, spent months planning the operation.  He experimented with mechanisms of all kinds; pulleys, ropes, levers, as well as tools he himself designed. He calcu