Blanca de Lizaur, PhD, MA, BA, Content specialist.

Tag: Mala situación financiera de los medios

The media and their many problems: KIOSKS SLOW DEATH

The media and their many problems: KIOSKS SLOW DEATH

For everybody, Para:, Magazine
We find some foreign cities both amazing and disappointing. Their broad boulevards, mile-long blocks, mirrored buildings, cleanliness and order, amaze us. Their barren sidewalks, cold coffee shops (literally freezing, since the air conditioning is used to “drive” people out, so other customers can occupy the tables quickly), and the lack of the bustle and chatter of people are ...disenchanting. Seeing somebody else on the street, in fact, doesn't make one feel safer; it may even scare you. Our cities have “life” because there are people out walking, musicians, street markets, people at their windows, human groups of all ages chatting excitedly ─or just playing─, newsstands, touts, con artists everywhere…; and coffee shops or food stalls along the sidewalks and in the squares, with temperat
No transaction without TRUST; <em>no trust without evidence of VALUES</em> –But WHOSE values…?

No transaction without TRUST; no trust without evidence of VALUES –But WHOSE values…?

Multimedia, For media people, Para:, Videos
1. The 2012 Edelman Trust Barometer [summary regarding Spain] [global summary in English] , the conclusions of which are presented in this video, shows a major drop in credibility and trust, towards almost all institutions, in practically all of the countries included in the study. That said, what's new…? Let us examine a few press headlines from the last three years, chosen at random, to understand what set off this crisis in trust, and the way it is affecting the media: “MGM Studio Files Bankruptcy; Eyes Lender Takeover” [MGM Studios, producers of the James Bond franchise, declare bankruptcy in court]; Jonathan Stempel; Gerald E. McCormick & Dave Zimmerman, eds.; El Economista.es; Nov. / 3 / 2010. “The Music Industry is Dying a Slow Death. Not just because of illegal downloa
Have you ever wondered  WHAT “MORBID” CONTENTS ARE?

Have you ever wondered WHAT “MORBID” CONTENTS ARE?

For media people, Para:, Magazine
In our language, and according to the “Diccionario de la Real Academia Española” (Dictionary of the Royal Spanish Academy), morbid means “a change in health [...], illness”. We may deduce that something is morbid when: 1) “it causes illness”, or 2), “causes unhealthy mental [...] reactions”. In English, and according to the Oxford Dictionary, “morbid” refers to someone “ …characterized by an abnormal and unhealthy interest in disturbing and unpleasant subjects, especially death and disease…”. In literary terminology, a morbid device is used to attract people's attention; it's a “hook”. In previous articles we established that works with family-oriented contents, “cleaner”/"more wholesome" ones (that is: those that least violate the values, ideas and beliefs of their target public), t
THE MYSTERIOUS CASE OF THE MISSING SPECTATOR has little to do with the Digital Revolution

THE MYSTERIOUS CASE OF THE MISSING SPECTATOR has little to do with the Digital Revolution

For everybody, Para:, Magazine
An important producer mentioned his concern that film –as in the complete experience of going to the cinema– was dying. There has been a progressive, constant and noteworthy decline in the number of spectators going to the movies over the last 30 years (not necessarily in the amount of money generated by these spectators, as box office prices have raised enormously during the same period).   In part, he blamed the economic crisis; but more importantly –and along with many others in the business, he blamed “videos” for the audience decline.  Who would want to go out to the movie theater when you can enjoy the film right at home, for free or for little? Of course this sounds both logical and reasonable; however it lacks appropriate contextualization. Why?  If “videos” were the only culpri
Steven Pinker: THE PRESENT FAILURE OF ELITE ART TO ATTRACT US  is linked to the blank slate theory.

Steven Pinker: THE PRESENT FAILURE OF ELITE ART TO ATTRACT US is linked to the blank slate theory.

Multimedia, For media people, Para:, Videos
In his book The blank slate; the modern denial of human nature (published in 2002), Steven Pinker, MIT and Harvard neurolinguist, gathers scientific evidence that all humans are born with innate traits, which are inherent to our species. In the present talk, Pinker remembers this book and how everyone around him expected it to generate an irated, intense, reaction against –which it did.  Implicitly, Pinker thus accepts the impressive pressure that is exercised over researchers, university teachers and thinkers in general, in order to prevent them from standing for anything that may adversely affect current agendas (political, economic, social...) –their limits differing broadly from the ones most people think. In other words:  Intelectual leaders are subject to the same pressur
WHAT HIGHLY EDUCATED PEOPLE READ…, when nobody watches

WHAT HIGHLY EDUCATED PEOPLE READ…, when nobody watches

For media people, Para:, Magazine
Pygmalion and Galatea… A professor gave his graduate students a poem written by a prestigious contemporary writer. A few minutes later he asked them what their favourite lines were, but nobody dared to answer: The poem, in spite of the author's reputation, was simply terrible. And although we have been trained to consider "beautiful" that which possesses great technical skill (even when the message, what is being said, is clearly horrible), the poem in question was not even technically noteworthy. That said, there is a kind of tacit agreement amongst members of the literary world that they should show their high regard and appreciation for works that the rest of them have praised, regardless of their true quality; and thus why many of us have occasionally been forced to praise “highbrow